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An award-winning writer’s essay offers a slice of real life for men of African descent in the diaspora, from the American South in the civil rights era to the hospitality room at festivals in England today

December 12 is being talked up as the date to settle the question of the UK’s withdrawal from the European Union. A grass-roots campaigner argues that it’s about much more than that – and makes a heartfelt plea to black voters.

Eminent personalities such as Otumfuo Osei Tutu II are part of the reason why Ghana is still alive and kicking.

Often Ghanaian diasporans return home and observe with awe, in some cases decades later, how things are done in the country they left behind. They do so because, in many situations, things have not changed much from the days of our grandparents ‒ and are done very differently from their new countries of abode.

Ghana is going to hell in a handcart, we are told. Good governance has become a show of power by the state or strength of partisan political will. The rule of law, transparency and accountability have become merely technical questions of administrative procedure or institutional design. Our politics and democratising processes are increasingly driven by indiscipline and an unbridled quest for power, not committed leadership. The masses’ involvement and expectation, fractured by a stagnant economy and a corrupt political class, still bear traces of an expansive view of government and unsustainable demands based on a sense of entitlement.

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